Moringa School starts its training courses in Kampala, Uganda

After signing a deal with MEST to offer its training courses to startups in Accra, Lagos and Cape Town in partnership with incubator MEST, Moringa School has now started offering its training courses in Uganda, Kampala, after it signed a partnership deal with the Kampala-based Outbox Hub in April.

Moringa is kicking it off with Prep, its 5-weeks, full-time fundamentals of programming course. The course accepts individuals without prior experience in software development. It leverages a blended learning approach that equips you with the software development skills, and soft skills required to transition you into the workplace. During Moringa prep, the firms will facilitate a learners learning through project based assignments, pair programming and peer assessments.

After Prep, learners can enroll for Moringa Core, a 15 week full time program to further hone their skills. The curriculum consists of HTML and CSS, Git, Command line, Markdown, JavaScript, Jquery and Bootstrap.

Through the partnership, Outbox says it will tap into Moringa’s experience in developing and delivering industry relevant technology education. It will also tap into its 40+ hiring partners all over the African continent to ensure that Outbox EDU graduates receive employment opportunities after graduation.

“With this partnership, our young people will be able to tap into world class learning & employment opportunities, thus improving the quality of our offering to potential software engineers in Uganda,” said Richard Zulu, CEO at Outbox  during the April launch. “Our collaboration with Moringa School goes a long way in supporting our mission to grow inclusive communities that foster talent where we operate. We are very excited to be working with them in Uganda and tapping into a Pan-African network.”

Moringa, which started operations in April 2014 in Nairobi, offers courses to Africans in person allowing them to participate in the global code economy. Recently, Moringa launched similar training programmes in Hong Kong, Ghana and Pakistan.

“There is huge demand for an in-person, blended learning course (which brings both the accountability and community of a classroom and our strong outcomes program that connects students to jobs – and also the high-quality content that you can find on MOOCs),” Cheng told TechMoran. “The World Bank did not give us any grants for Hong Kong and Ghana. Those were all revenues coming directly from students. Pakistan is being funded by both the World Bank and Pakistani government because they want to bring our successful model to Pakistan,” she added.

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