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Home Reviews Electromagnetic Treatment Offers Hope To HIV/AIDS Patients In South Africa

Electromagnetic Treatment Offers Hope To HIV/AIDS Patients In South Africa

by Stella Kabura
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HIVEX, a new device that uses electromagnetic current has been offering a hundreds of HIV/AIDS patients in Durban, South Africa a sense of hope, following a discovery which noted that the application of electric current on microorganisms has an effect on bacteria and viruses including HIV.

HIVEX Ltd team of researchers on their blog noted that clinical data showed that adequately dosed patients were 5.7 times less likely to be admitted to hospital, die or need antiviral drugs (ARVs), especially when used in groups of people for two and a half hours daily over a two week period.

However, while HIV/AIDS has killed millions of people leaving more than 48 million AIDS orphans, with survivors having to rely on ARV drugs, the HIVEX treatment has faced official complaints from pharmaceutical organisations, just before end of year annual HIV/AIDS campaigns, forcing the HIVEX Ltd. to recently close its clinic in South Africa and target elsewhere to roll out the treatment.

“Treatments stopped in April last year, after around 1,200 people. Despite being recommended for Ministerial approval in South Africa in 2005, HIVEX simply couldn’t get confirmation that we could, in fact, operate,” affirmed HIVEX Ltd. on its Facebook page, “We need big funds to do new trials in another country, or a change of heart in South Africa.  Many people are walking around as a testimony to what we did, and we have lots of requests from people whose friends or family were treated to reopen.”

Using less than 12 volts of electric power, the HIVEX treatment works by isolating a part of the electro-magnetic spectrum of specific DNA sequences or proteins, using an electro-magnetic field which is specific to the virus’s spectral band to treating the patient. The treatment causes resonance of equivalent proteins in the virus within patients that eventually disables the virus, reports say.

However, the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) in South Africa, that states that Antiretroviral Drugs are the only treatment proven effective against the disease, filed a complaint on grounds that the HIVEX treatment does not base its findings on scientific evidence. TAC emphasised that it is unlawful and unethical to advertise treatments without scientific evidence. Thus, TAC also wrote an open letter to HIVEX asking it to shut down its adverts and campaigns.

The European regulatory authorities on the other hand, accepted that the trials showed a significant lower level of death of CD4 lymphocytes but refused registration in Europe, stating that although the clinical data showed an effect on HIV patients, it was a concern that the mechanism of treatment was not explained. Authorities also stated that a significant lower level of death of immune system cells had been measured and it is unknown whether it is of significance to the progress of the disease.

Nevertheless, HIVEX, according to TAC, still runs its blogs and campaigns as it awaits to receive approval from major official bodies as it looks for funds. Moreover, the instrument has not been evaluated by the World Health Organisation and thus, it is only used for experimental purposes, not intended to treat or mitigate disease.

For details of a HIVEX treatment pilot study done, visit:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nkAVv4E6zg.

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